There is limited evidence on characterization and natural history of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT)-induced left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The aim of this work was to characterize clinical features and long-term evolution of SVT-induced LV dysfunction. Patients consecutively admitted with sustained SVT and heart rate >100 bpm as the only known cause of a new onset LV systolic dysfunction (i.e., LV ejection fraction [EF] <50%) were analyzed. Patients were then revaluated periodically. Recovered LVEF (i.e., ≥50%) and a composite of death, heart transplant or first episode of major ventricular arrhythmias were evaluated as study end-points. We enrolled 83 patients. After SVT therapy, 56 (67%) showed a recovered LVEF at the last follow-up of median 54 (interquartile range 36 to 87) months. Seventeen (30%) of those patients had a temporary new drop in LVEF during follow-up associated to high-rate SVT relapse. At presentation, patients with recovered LVEF were younger (52 vs 67 years respectively, p <0.001) and had higher LVEF (34% vs 27% respectively, p = 0.005) compared to non-recovered LVEF patients. Finally, 4% of recovered LVEF patients vs 26% of nonrecovered LVEF patients experienced death/heart transplant/major ventricular arrhythmias during follow-up (p = 0.004). In conclusion, after almost 5 years of follow-up, two-thirds of patients with high-rate SVT causing a newly diagnosed LV systolic dysfunction recovered and maintained normal LV function after SVT control, with a subsequent benign outcome. Long term individual surveillance is required in those patients, as arrhythmic recurrences and new drops in LVEF are common in the long term.

Supraventricular Tachycardia Causing Left Ventricular Dysfunction

Zaffalon D.;Pagura L.;Barbati G.;Gregorio C.;Finocchiaro G.;Zecchin M.;Fabris E.;Merlo M.
;
Sinagra G.
2021

Abstract

There is limited evidence on characterization and natural history of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT)-induced left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The aim of this work was to characterize clinical features and long-term evolution of SVT-induced LV dysfunction. Patients consecutively admitted with sustained SVT and heart rate >100 bpm as the only known cause of a new onset LV systolic dysfunction (i.e., LV ejection fraction [EF] <50%) were analyzed. Patients were then revaluated periodically. Recovered LVEF (i.e., ≥50%) and a composite of death, heart transplant or first episode of major ventricular arrhythmias were evaluated as study end-points. We enrolled 83 patients. After SVT therapy, 56 (67%) showed a recovered LVEF at the last follow-up of median 54 (interquartile range 36 to 87) months. Seventeen (30%) of those patients had a temporary new drop in LVEF during follow-up associated to high-rate SVT relapse. At presentation, patients with recovered LVEF were younger (52 vs 67 years respectively, p <0.001) and had higher LVEF (34% vs 27% respectively, p = 0.005) compared to non-recovered LVEF patients. Finally, 4% of recovered LVEF patients vs 26% of nonrecovered LVEF patients experienced death/heart transplant/major ventricular arrhythmias during follow-up (p = 0.004). In conclusion, after almost 5 years of follow-up, two-thirds of patients with high-rate SVT causing a newly diagnosed LV systolic dysfunction recovered and maintained normal LV function after SVT control, with a subsequent benign outcome. Long term individual surveillance is required in those patients, as arrhythmic recurrences and new drops in LVEF are common in the long term.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11368/2998397
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