Introduction and objectives: To evaluate the impact of the Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score on perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes of bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC). Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed a multi-institutional cohort of 347 patients treated with RC for clinical-localized BC between 2005 and 2019. The CONUT-score was defined as an algorithm including serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, and cholesterol. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the CONUT-score to predict any-grade complications, major complications and 30 days readmission. Multivariable Cox' regression models were performed to evaluate the prognostic effect of the CONUT-score on recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results: A cut-off value to discriminate between low and high CONUT-score was determined by calculating the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area under the curve was 0.72 hence high CONUT-score was defined as ≥3 points. Overall, 112 (32.3%) patients had a high CONUT. At multivariable logistic regression analyses, high CONUT was associated with any-grade complications (OR 3.58, P = 0.001), major complications (OR 2.56, P = 0.003) and 30 days readmission (OR 2.39, P = 0.01). On multivariable Cox' regression analyses, high CONUT remained associated with worse RFS (HR 2.57, P < 0.001), OS (HR 2.37, P < 0.001) and CSS (HR 3.52, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Poor nutritional status measured by the CONUT-score is independently associated with a poorer postoperative course after RC and is predictive of worse RFS, OS, and CSS. This simple index could serve as a comprehensive personalized risk-stratification tool identifying patients who may benefit from an intensified regimen of supportive cares.

Impact of the controlling nutritional status (CONUT) score on perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes in patients with bladder cancer treated with radical cystectomy

Claps, Francesco
;
Mazzon, Giorgio;Boltri, Matteo;Traunero, Fabio;Liguori, Giovanni;Celia, Antonio;Trombetta, Carlo;Pavan, Nicola
2022-01-01

Abstract

Introduction and objectives: To evaluate the impact of the Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score on perioperative morbidity and oncological outcomes of bladder cancer (BC) patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC). Materials and methods: We retrospectively analyzed a multi-institutional cohort of 347 patients treated with RC for clinical-localized BC between 2005 and 2019. The CONUT-score was defined as an algorithm including serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, and cholesterol. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the CONUT-score to predict any-grade complications, major complications and 30 days readmission. Multivariable Cox' regression models were performed to evaluate the prognostic effect of the CONUT-score on recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results: A cut-off value to discriminate between low and high CONUT-score was determined by calculating the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area under the curve was 0.72 hence high CONUT-score was defined as ≥3 points. Overall, 112 (32.3%) patients had a high CONUT. At multivariable logistic regression analyses, high CONUT was associated with any-grade complications (OR 3.58, P = 0.001), major complications (OR 2.56, P = 0.003) and 30 days readmission (OR 2.39, P = 0.01). On multivariable Cox' regression analyses, high CONUT remained associated with worse RFS (HR 2.57, P < 0.001), OS (HR 2.37, P < 0.001) and CSS (HR 3.52, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Poor nutritional status measured by the CONUT-score is independently associated with a poorer postoperative course after RC and is predictive of worse RFS, OS, and CSS. This simple index could serve as a comprehensive personalized risk-stratification tool identifying patients who may benefit from an intensified regimen of supportive cares.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3034558
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