Purpose: Calcitonin (Ct) is currently the most sensitive biochemical marker of C-cell disease (medullary thyroid cancer [MTC] and C-cell hyperplasia), but its specificity is relatively low. Our aim was to examine whether autoimmune atrophic gastritis (AAG) and chronic hypergastrinemia, with or without chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (AT), are conditions associated with increased Ct levels. Methods: Three groups of patients were consecutively enrolled in this  multicentric study: group A consisted of patients with histologically-proven AAG (n = 13; 2 males, 11 females); group B fulfilled the criteria for group A but also had AT (n = 92; 15 males, 77 females); and group C included patients with AT and without AAG (n = 37; 6 males, 31 females). Results: Median Ct levels did not differ between the three groups. Ct levels were undetectable in: 8/13 cases (61.5%) in group A, 70/92 (76.1%) in group B, and 27/37 (73.0%) in group C. They were detectable but ≤ 10 ng/L in 4/13 (30.8%), 20/92 (21.7%) and 7/37 (18.9%) cases, respectively; and they were > 10 ng/L in 1/13 (7.7%), 2/92 (2.2%) and 3/37 (8.1%) cases, respectively (P = 0.5). Only three patients had high Ct levels (> 10 ng/L) and high gastrin levels and had an MTC. There was no correlation between Ct and gastrin levels (P = 0.353, r = 0.0785). Conclusions: High gastrin levels in patients with AAG do not explain any hypercalcitoninemia, regardless of whether patients have AT or not. This makes it mandatory to complete the diagnostic process to rule out MTC in patients with high Ct levels and AAG.

Calcitonin levels in autoimmune atrophic gastritis-related hypergastrinemia

Fabris, B
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Bernardi, S
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2024-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: Calcitonin (Ct) is currently the most sensitive biochemical marker of C-cell disease (medullary thyroid cancer [MTC] and C-cell hyperplasia), but its specificity is relatively low. Our aim was to examine whether autoimmune atrophic gastritis (AAG) and chronic hypergastrinemia, with or without chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (AT), are conditions associated with increased Ct levels. Methods: Three groups of patients were consecutively enrolled in this  multicentric study: group A consisted of patients with histologically-proven AAG (n = 13; 2 males, 11 females); group B fulfilled the criteria for group A but also had AT (n = 92; 15 males, 77 females); and group C included patients with AT and without AAG (n = 37; 6 males, 31 females). Results: Median Ct levels did not differ between the three groups. Ct levels were undetectable in: 8/13 cases (61.5%) in group A, 70/92 (76.1%) in group B, and 27/37 (73.0%) in group C. They were detectable but ≤ 10 ng/L in 4/13 (30.8%), 20/92 (21.7%) and 7/37 (18.9%) cases, respectively; and they were > 10 ng/L in 1/13 (7.7%), 2/92 (2.2%) and 3/37 (8.1%) cases, respectively (P = 0.5). Only three patients had high Ct levels (> 10 ng/L) and high gastrin levels and had an MTC. There was no correlation between Ct and gastrin levels (P = 0.353, r = 0.0785). Conclusions: High gastrin levels in patients with AAG do not explain any hypercalcitoninemia, regardless of whether patients have AT or not. This makes it mandatory to complete the diagnostic process to rule out MTC in patients with high Ct levels and AAG.
2024
17-lug-2023
Pubblicato
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40618-023-02152-x
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11368/3052533
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